Program for Theological Education by Extension

Providing evangelical theological education to Arabic-speaking Christians and church leaders
wherever they live in the Arab World for the advancement of God's Kingdom

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Following is a complete list of PTEE’s Bachelor of Theology courses, which may be credited towards the Certificate and Diploma of Theology as well. The BTh courses below have been arranged according to PTEE’s four major curricular divisions. All courses are at a university (degree) level of study.

Bachelor of Theology Courses
Division I – The Christian and His/Her Spiritual Life

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Division II – The Christian and His/Her Bible

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Division III – The Christian and His/Her Skills

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Division IV – The Christian and His/Her Society

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The Christian Life Course Description

By the end of this course the student will have been give the opportunity to enhance his/her:
(i)     Understanding of God, personal knowing of Him and continuing growth in this knowledge,
(ii)    Grasp of the Word of God and the need to submit to it and hold it to its promises,
(iii)   Realization of oneness with Christ in his death, resurrection and daily living,
(iv)   Exercise of spiritual gifts in the ministries of the church,
(v)    Success in witnessing for Christ,
(vi)   Ability to do self-examination and control self-will,
(vii)  Approach to facing problems and difficulties and
(viii) Skills in developing relationships with others.

Christian Ethics Course Description

By the end of this course the student should be able to:
(i)     Explain the relationship between Christian ethics and other theological, biblical, social and philosophical sciences, define Christian ethics, and explain its importance, role and scope;
(ii)    Give a clear picture of the ethical crisis in the region and the reasons behind that;
(iii)   Know how to use both the Old Testament and the New Testament to deduce Christian principles, and present a summary of the biblical basis and principles of Christian ethics, and its application to life and to some contemporary ethical issues;
(iv)   State how the Lord Jesus and Paul used the Old Testament and (in Paul’s case) Jesus’ teaching to deal with ethical issues;
(v)    Write an article or research paper and summarize an article or lesson on particular ethical subjects;
(vi)   Learn how to formulate personal Christian ethical decisions using a suggested methodology;
(vii)  Practically apply the method of formulating Christian ethical decisions to the issues of artificial insemination, immigration, and bigotry.

Christian Stewardship Course Description

By the end of this course the student should be able to:
(i)     define Christian stewardship biblically;
(ii)    Explain God’s plan for salvation and carry it out as a steward;
(iii)   Apply the concept of Biblical stewardship to his gifts, work, time, environment, and properties;
(iv)   Show the importance of giving, its motivations, its types, and its goals;
(v)    Demonstrate the Bible’s teaching about giving, and the development of the concept of giving in the history of the Church;
(vi)   Apply stewardship principles in his family, his country, and his church and;
(vii)  Explain stewardship in the local church and the church’s responsibility for helping Christians to apply stewardship in a practical way.

Spiritual Disciplines Course Description

This course describes the importance of spiritual disciplines in the life of a Christian, so that he can live victorious life, being conformed to the image of Jesus. It describes the situation of humans as a result of sin, and the need for God’s changing power.

In this course, students study how Jesus practiced the spiritual disciplines in his earthly life. The course explains these disciplines briefly and effectively: prayer, meditation, fasting, solitude, studying the Bible, silence, practical service, fellowship, confession, faith, obedience, and evangelism.  Through this course, the student’s life will be opened to God’s changing power.

Principles for Understanding the Bible Today Course Description

By the end of this course, the student should be able to:
(i)     Use various inductive approaches to Bible study including passage analysis, word studies, topical studies and character studies,
(ii)    Identify and correctly apply six principles for Biblical exposition through utilizing 12 steps for drawing out the meaning of the Biblical text in order to discover its meaning for today and how to apply it to his or her daily life,
(iii)   Gain skill in using the concordance, Bible dictionary and other expository resources in order to come to a clearer understanding of the Bible.

Old Testament Survey – I Course Description

By the end of this course the student should be able to:

(i) State the significance of God’s covenant in the Old Testament from Biblical, historical, geographical and theological perspectives from Genesis to the end of the united kingdom (reign of Solomon),
(ii) Develop a ministry resource notebook containing a title for each chapter in each book of the first thirteen books of the Old Testament so that he or she can think through the theme of the book according to what they know about the history, geography and life events of the Biblical personalities,
(iii) Shape the insights of Schultz and Grieve (course textbooks) into a comprehensive understanding of the first thirteen books of the Old Testament,
(iv) Link the historical and geographical situations of the context to a clear theological understanding of the text,
(v) Prepare a time line in order to synchronize the timing of Biblical events with the chronologies of Egyptian, Palestinian and Mesopotamian civilizations and
(vi) Discuss the Old Testament covenants and their relationship to the covenant of God with humankind through Jesus Christ in the New Testament through studying secular historical information on covenants in ancient civilization.

Old Testament Survey – II Course Description

By the end of this course the student should be able to:
(i)     Summarize the contents of the books of the Old Testament from the beginning of the divided kingdom (II Kings, I Chronicles and part of II Chronicles) to the end of the Old Testament (from Ezra through to Malachi);
(ii)    Utilize portions of the Wisdom Literature for worship and pastoral care;
(iii)   Narrate Old Testament history from after the time of Solomon to the end of the OT;
(iv)   Explain how the Old Testament provides a foundation for understanding the New Testament and the life and work of Jesus the Messiah and
(v)    Articulate theological principles for personal application and ministry.

Studies in the Book of Genesis Course Description

By the end of this course the student should be able to:
(i)     Present the basic subjects of the book and integrate them into a comprehensive summary of the book,
(ii)    Compare chosen theological concepts with the general teaching of the Bible,
(iii)   Assess various points of view of the story of creation and become familiar with evolutionary theories and the critical positions of recent scientific thinking,
(iv)   Form a Biblically and logically supported view of the creation,
(v)    List the succession of events of the period preceding the Fathers,
(vi)   Survey the life of each of the Fathers and link the Fathers to the historical circumstances in which they lived, and
(vii)  Apply the principles derived from the study of the Fathers to contemporary life.

Inductive Study in the Book of Jeremiah Course Description

By the end of this course, the student should be able to:
(i)     Explain the use of the inductive way of studying the Bible,
(ii)    Clarify the historical and literary background of Jeremiah and use proper methods for analyzing this literary genre,
(iii)   Divide the book into passages, sections and divisions and title each,
(iv)   Explain principles of structural analysis and apply them to the study of the book in order to make a general outline of the Book of Jeremiah, and
(v)    Identify the allegorical types in the book and explain them in the light of the historical and literary context of the Book of Jeremiah.

New Testament Survey – I Course Description

By the end of this course the student should be able to:
(I)     Identify the historical and geographical backgrounds pertinent to the study of the four Gospels and the Epistles of the New Testament,
(ii)    Construct maps and charts to identify important places, dates, persons and events that impact the unfolding of the New Testament,
(iii)   Give the date, occasion, author and purpose of composition of the four gospels, Matthew, Mark, Luke and John,
(iv)   Create chapter titles for each chapter of the four Gospels in order to learn the succession of events and identify the parallel passages between the four gospels.

New Testament Survey – II Course Description

By the end of this course the student should be able to:
(i)     Identify the historical and geographical backgrounds pertinent to the study of Acts, the Pauline and General Epistles and the Book of Revelation,
(ii)    Construct maps and charts to identify important places, dates, persons and events that impact the unfolding of the New Testament,
(iii)   Give the date, occasion, author and purpose of Acts through the Book of Revelation;
(iv)   Create chapter titles for each chapter of Acts through Revelation in order to learn the succession of events, teachings and parallel passages for personal application and ministry.

Christ and His Work Course Description

By the end of this course, the student should be able to:
(i)     Explain the significance of Jesus Christ’s relationship to God, man, the church, doing God’s will, world history; the expression “Jesus is Lord”; and state the impact of these relationships on His resurrection,
(ii)    Clarify the relationship between the miracles of Jesus and the laws of nature, and describe the impact of this relationship on our understanding of the Kingdom of God and peace of God, including pre-, post- and a-millennial concepts,
(iii)   Apply situations found in Jesus Christ’s day to situations found in his or her life today,
(iv)   Discuss what Jesus did on issues like social equality, resisting the Roman occupation and his interaction with the poor,
(v)    Describe how Christ’s suffering becomes our suffering, how the picture of suffering is included in the names Son of Man and Suffering Servant, the four meanings for his death mentioned in the Last Supper, and our solidarity with Christ in two events of His life, and
(vi)   Articulate how the cross was the judgment of God for our sins and explain the salvation of Christ and its relationship to the Holy Spirit, God the Father and the complete liberation the salvation of Christ produces.

Inductive Study in the Mark’s Gospel Course Description

By the end of this course the student should be able to:
(i)     Explain the inductive approach to the study of the Bible,
(ii)    Discover the structure the Book of Mark and apply it to understanding the book,
(iii)   Demonstrate the ability to title sections of the Biblical text and bring the titles together in accordance with the overall purpose of the book,
(iv)   Prepare a general layout for the book,
(v)    Apply the methods of observation, explanation and application to study a New Testament book, and
(vi)   Prepare a guide for selected portions of the Gospel of Mark.

Studies in the Book of Acts Course Description

By the end of this course the student should be able to:
(i)     State the general outline of the Book of Acts, write a title for each chapter, describe the main subjects and the general structure of the book, and describe in detail individual characters within the text,
(ii)    Explain why the Book of Acts plays a main role in the whole Bible,
(iii)   Describe at least eight specific methods which demonstrate a movement of centrifugal force in the life of the early church,
(iv)   Give at least four examples that show the continuity of the ministry of Jesus in the life of the early church,
(v)    Mention the three most important factors that led to the growth of the early church,
(vi)   Describe the essential elements of Peter’s and Paul’s evangelistic preaching,
(vii)  Narrate in detail Paul’s conversion, and give an outline of the life of at least two other early Christian characters,
(viii) Summarize thirteen different mission principles found in the book of Acts, and apply them to contemporary situations, and
(ix)   State the principles for N.T. church growth, and apply them to contemporary situations.

Studies in the Book of Romans Course Description

By the end of this course the student should be able to:
(i)     Identify the subject content of each chapter of this letter,
(ii)    Write a chapter summary for each chapter,
(iii)   chart Paul’s teaching throughout the Epistle to the Romans on the subjects of righteousness, sin, the flesh, the Holy spirit, solidarity with Christ, the Law, faith, struggling with the flesh, typical Christian life, salvation, the Jewish nation, the sovereignty of the state, and love,
(iv)   Memorize key verses for helping to establish an enlightened Christian mind and for knowing how to answer those who have doubts about salvation by grace,
(v)    Define the attitude of Christianity towards the works of the Law,
(vi)   Identify the meaning of theological terms like righteousness, atonement, propitiation, salvation, the flesh, the death of the Christian to sin, and the death of Christ for sin, and
(vii)  State right attitudes for the Christian to use in facing difficult issues in daily life.

Studies in the Pastoral Epistles Course Description

By the end of this course the student should be able to:
(i)     Identify the author of the Epistles after studying the authorship issues,
(ii)    Describe the historical, geographical, theological and philosophical backgrounds for this period,
(iii)   Present the data for the Apostle Paul’s three missionary journeys and the supposed fourth journey,
(iv)   Apply principles learned in the course to life and service in the local church,
(v)    Identify personal convictions on the key issues mentioned in the Epistles such as leadership, Christian service, the ministry of women, the conscience, the meaning of the expressions Paul‘s Gospel and following Paul’s example, and
(vi)   Prepare a detailed study of these letters that portrays their main characteristics.

Studies in the Book of Hebrews Course Description

By the end of this course the student should be able to:
(i)     Give the historical background and apparent spiritual condition of the readers of the letter;
(ii)    Explain any portion of the book in accordance with the following steps: observation, background from the Old Testament, explanation and application;
(iii)   Explain God’s plan for the ages;
(iv)   Demonstrate the four fundamental steps towards maturity (perfection) by shaping his or her own personal life in light of them;
(v)    Articulate two purposes from the purposes of God as revealed in the covenants, and apply them to himself or herself.

Basic Christian Doctrine – I Course Description

By the end of this course, the student should be able to:
(i)     Define the major theological terms used in the course,
(ii)    Discuss the biblical truths and major issues related to the creation, God, the Godhead, the Trinity, His personality, the inspiration, nature and canonicity of the Bible, miracles and prayer, righteous and evil Angels,
(iii)   Identify the major biblical content of the subjects dealt with and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of liberal, atheist, and traditional ideas concerning them, so as to refute ideas and theories which do not agree with the word of God,
(iv)   Express biblically his/her own beliefs on the topics covered and so begin to develop his/her own systematic theology,
(v)    Explain the importance of studying Systematic Theology for spiritual growth and enlightenment, and its effect on the life of people in ministry, and
(vi)   Practically apply the theology studied to his/her own life, relationships, ministries in the church and the society, and be able to use it to teach others.

Basic Christian Doctrine – II Course Description

By the end of this course the student should be able to:
(i)     Define the major theological terms used in the course,
(ii)    Discuss the biblical truths and major issues related to the creation of Man, his fall and the nature of his essence; the doctrines of Christ and the Holy Spirit; the person of Christ, and His complete work of propitiation on the Cross, His resurrection and ascension; and divine election, the perseverance of the saints, baptism in the Holy Spirit, and other applications of the atonement in the Christian life, including glorification and union with Christ,
(iii)   Identify the major biblical content of the subjects dealt with and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of liberal, atheist, and traditional ideas concerning them, so as to refute ideas and theories which do not agree with the word of God,
(iv)   Express biblically his/her own beliefs on the topics covered and so begin to develop his/her own systematic theology, and
(v)    Practically apply the theology studied to his/her own life, relationships, ministries in the church and the society, and be able to use it to teach others.

Basic Christian Doctrine – III Course Description

By the end of this course the student should be able to:
(i)     Define the major theological terms used in the course,
(ii)    Discuss the biblical truths and major issues related to the nature, purpose, unity and authority of the Church; Church government; baptism, the Lord’s Supper, worship and spiritual gifts; the return of Christ, the millennium, final judgment, and the new heavens and new earth,
(iii)   Identify the major biblical content of the subjects dealt with and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of liberal, atheist, and traditional ideas concerning them, so as to refute ideas and theories which do not agree with the word of God,
(iv)   Express biblically his/her own beliefs on the topics covered and so begin to develop his/her own systematic theology, and
(v)    Practically apply the theology studied to his/her own life, relationships, ministries in the church and the society, and be able to use it to teach others.

Introduction to the Greek of the New Testament Course Description

By the end of this course the student should be able to:
(i)     Be completely familiar with the Greek alphabet and some of the basic grammar and vocabulary of the Greek language, to the level of being able to understand commentaries of the New Testament Greek text and;
(ii)    Understand principles of explanation and interpretation of the Greek New Testament.

Holy Spirit Course Description

This course deals with the basic concepts of the Holy Spirit as taught in the Bible. It also presents the historical church doctrine of the Holy Spirit as the third person of the Trinity. This course addresses controversial topics such as the baptism of the Holy Spirit, speaking in tongues, and the filling of the Holy Spirit. Students will also study the doctrine taught by Christ that the Comforter was given to the disciples and is given to all believers. The Holy Spirit glorifies Christ by filling the believer with His presence, and He gives guidance for the church. This course encourages the students to deepen their understanding of the Spirit and to enrich the experiential, emotional and practical aspects of the doctrine of the Holy Spirit.

Art of Preaching – I Course Description

By the end of this course the student should be able to:
(i)     Prepare topical, textual and expository sermons from the Letter to the Philippians,
(ii)    Discuss the tools for analyzing the factors that affect the Biblical context and the context of the audience listening to the sermon,
(iii)   List and use different methods of illustration, and
(iv)   Write a sermon that applies the principles learned in the course.

Art of Preaching – II Course Description

By the end of this course the student should be able to:
(i)     Present the general principles of various types of speech and communication,
(ii)    Demonstrate the various types of speech principles for group and individual communication,
(iii)   Explain the use of audio and video communication media and gain experience with two applications of them,
(iv)   Demonstrate the skills of speaking, presenting, and offering a message for the purpose of evaluation, and
(v)    Explain and use several traditional media approaches in his or her society.

The Art of Communication Course Description

By the end of this course the student should be able to:
(i)     Learn various methods of communication,
(ii)    Discuss communication obstacles and analyze the methods to overcome these obstacles,
(iii)   Do research in topics of cross-cultural communication,
(iv)   Discover various and different means of communication.

Art of Teaching Course Description

By the end of this course the student should be able to:
(i)     List the nine stages of the cycle of learning, and mention the goal and the main contents of the learning ministry in his/her church, and list the characteristics and needs of students according to their age stages, considering all ages but especially youth,
(ii)    Suggest methods to bring Christian Education to the areas or fields which affect people more strongly,
(iii)   Explain the importance of the four dimensions of learning showing the internal relationship between them, explain the relationship between the learning levels: cognitive learning, affectional learning, and behavioral learning, and design questions for every stage,
(iv)   Show understanding of the development stages suggested by the important psychologists, including their importance for Christian Education,
(v)    Explain the reason why a curriculum which is built on felt needs makes the process of Christian maturation easier, develop a curriculum based on the felt needs of the student’s group for three months, and evaluate ready made curricula,
(vi)   Mention four stages of the “psychological order” of lessons, “Hook, Book, Look, Took”, and develop lessons based on them, demonstrating the effect of the hidden and the null curricula on all these, and describe methods for excellence and creativity in the teaching ministry.

Pastoral Ministries Course Description

By the end of this course, the student should be able to:
(i)     Summarize the fundamental elements of individual relationships,
(ii)    Outline the basic needs of the different age groups in one’s congregation,
(iii)   Develop a spirit of servanthood,
(iv)   Acquire the Biblical posture of compassion, sensitivity, listening and understanding, and apply these skills in experimental situations,
(v)    Prepare to participate in various seasonal events and special occasions like weddings ands funerals while taking into account Biblical principles and local traditions,
(vi)   Consider problems that emerge in pastoral care and find solutions and
(vii)  Begin to prepare personal resources for ministering at special occasions.

Christian Counseling Course Description

By the end of this course the student should be able to:
(i)     Describe the main spiritual and psychological problems of the local society,
(ii)    Explain from a Biblical standpoint basic principles for dealing with these problems in ways suitable to the local culture,
(iii)   List and develop the essential principles of psychology,
(iv)   Help people who are facing crises and personal difficulties,
(v)    Role play problems and discuss possible solutions.
Note: Christian Counseling is an introductory course to counseling. Additional courses, seminars and guided praxis are necessary to qualify the individual as a Christian counselor.

Christian Education Course Description

By the end of this course the student should be able to:
(i)     Define the various stages of education for children,
(ii)    Explain the role played by the family in Christian Education for children,
(iii)   Demonstrate a basic philosophy of Christian Education,
(iv)   List the basic principles of Christian education and link them to the various programs of the church, and
(v)    State the basic methods of teaching.

Christian Discipleship Course Description

By the end of the course the student should be able to:
(i)     Give a definition of “discipleship”, and explain its meaning in Greek and Hebrew, list the personal and spiritual characteristics of the disciple, explain the difference between the born again believer and the disciple, and show the relationship between them using the example and strategy of Jesus and the apostles, and evaluate his/her own discipleship and that of his/her church,
(ii)    Identify the personal and spiritual characteristics of a disciple-maker, and explain the expression “discipleship is a lifestyle”,
(iii)   State the importance and the necessity of discipleship in the ministry of the church in fulfilling the Great Commission, explain the difference between multiplication and addition, list reasons why Christians do not like to be involved in this ministry, and dis­cuss the role of the church and the family, and the relation between them, in discipleship,
(iv)   Explain the three stages of discipleship (follow up, discipleship, the ability to disciple others), the role of each stage and its goals, and explain why the great commission involves more than just evangelism,
(v)    Identify difficulties faced by the discipleship ministry, and know how to analyze and describe them, identify their causes, determine to what extent they are found in his/her church today, and how to deal with them.
(vi)   Practically use skills of disciple-making, follow up, and evangelism in conjunction with the book “Abundant Life”, student book, and tutor book.

Church Management and Leadership Course Description

By the end of the course, the student should be able to:
(i)     Demonstrate awareness of the principles of Biblical administration, planning and goal setting,
(ii)    Explain church discipline and its Biblical basis,
(iii)   Describe the role of music in the church and participate in the leading of singing,
(iv)   State Biblical concepts of leadership and the needed qualifications of the leader,
(v)    Seek out leadership potential and nourish it and
(vi)   Identify a potential leader and train him/her in pastoral care.

House Groups Course Description

By the end of this course the student should be able to:
(i)     Articulate a Biblical historical perspective on the local church,
(ii)    List and discuss the basic principles for establishing a house group,
(iii)   Present a complete plan for establishing a house group,
(iv)   Identify probable locations for establishing successful house groups, and
(v)    Organize a house group and lead it for not less than six weeks.

The World Christian Movement  Course Description

By the end of the course the student should be able to:
(i)     Explain the biblical foundation for world mission, define what “mission” is, demonstrate both that the main theme of the Bible is the restoration of the sovereignty of the Kingdom of God on earth and the redemption of people from every tongue, nation, and tribe for His glory, and that its content is chiefly about God (what He has done, what He is doing now, and what He will do in the future).
(ii)    Clearly understand God’s mission in the world, including the development of the world Christian movement throughout history, what God is doing now and expectations for the future, and be informed about and understand the strategic challenges and possibilities available for reaching out across different cultures with the Gospel message.
(iii)   Make informed decisions about his/her involvement in helping to fulfil the Great commission (Matt 28:19) in his/her country or abroad, whether as a go-er, active sender, equipper, or a welcomer.
(iv)   Explain in detail God’s mission in the world using four perspectives:  Biblical (the goal of bringing redemption to all nations), Historical (the progress of the world Christian movement), Cultural (how culture and context impact the practice of mission) andStrategic (strategies of evangelism and church planting).
(v)    Present a detailed research paper on strategies for reaching a specific cultural group (other than the student’s own culture).

Church Growth Course Description

By the end of this course the student should be able to:
(i)     List three principals for church growth and how to evaluate their use,
(ii)    Explain the common basis between harvest theology and search theology,
(iii)   Explain the importance of needing to know about the growth of the church in precise terms,
(iv)   Name and define the three dimensions of church growth (numerical growth, quality growth and biological growth), and explain the relationships that link these three dimensions internally,
(v)    Clarify how to examine a church’s growth,
(vi)   List the motivations of renewal (that encourages a person to accept the Lord Jesus Christ as Savior), and define revival and the likely factors necessary to see revival happen,
(vii)  Explain the mass movement (people movement) approach for accepting Christian faith and its characteristics, and define its meaning based on anthropology as a whole.

Study Skills & Research Methods Course Description

By the end of this course the student should be able to:
(i)     Explain seven major learning styles and list the factors that make learning most effective, including how personal or self-management assists in the learning process, and will have drafted a personal study program;
(ii)    Discuss the necessity, value and potential pitfalls of serious biblical and theological study;
(iii)   Understand a variety of learning-related skills and techniques and be able to apply these to their biblical and theological studies, thus being better equipped for such studies; specifically, they will have acquired or refined skills with regard to listening, reading, note-taking, summarizing, consolidating, memorization, writing reviews, using libraries;
(iv)   Analyse and interpret essay (or exam) questions, plan an essay outline, structure research toward the topic, write, edit and format an essay and develop an accurate bibliography and appropriate footnoting;
(v)    Plan a study timetable for exams and prepare thoroughly for them, and explain what good examination technique involves;
(vi)   Learn basic word-processing skills and how to make use of the internet as an information resource;
(vii)  Explain the concept of life-long learning (with respect to biblical, theological, ministry, and spiritual formation), be encouraged to make a commitment to this process beyond their formal studies, and be able to develop a personal action plan for such learning;
(viii) Relate their learning experiences to their personal walk with God on a daily basis.

Church History – I Course Description

By the end of this course the student should be able to:
(i)     Present a general survey of Church History from its beginnings to the European Reformation (5 BC to AD 1517) that focuses especially on the origin, nature, purpose, organization, teaching, doctrine, literature, problems and progress of the Church,
(ii)    Narrate the dates, places and events of key characters, and demonstrate how to use maps for locating important places,
(iii)   Present a detailed chart of Church History from the Day of Pentecost in AD 33 to the beginning of the European Reformation of the Church in AD 1517, and include in the chart persons, dates, events, and important places
(iv)   Explain the development of the Church and the Church’s relationship to social, cultural and political struggles and the affect of Christianity on societies,
(v)    Generalize lessons from church history that accurately explain the historical data, and
(vi)   Compare what has been learned in Church History with the particular history and situation of his/her church today and suggest what might be done in his or her situation.

Church History – II Course Description

By the end of the course the student should be able to:
(i)     Discuss the Protestant Reformation, mentioning its causes and the reform attempts which preceded Luther and Calvin, and listing the views of other denominations, and explain the life history of Luther and Calvin using a historical, critical, and analytical, educational approach,
(ii)    Identify the date of the great division, and the religious, economical, political, and geographical factors which led to its occurrence,
(iii)   Explain the theology of the Orthodox church, the reasons for its survival, and the most important activities of its prominent theological fathers throughout history, evaluate their theology in light of the Bible and evangelical beliefs, and discuss attempts at reformation from within the Orthodox church,
(iv)   Repeat (iii) with respect to the other eastern churches in the region (i.e. the two branches of the Assyrian church, “Nestorian” and “Jacobean”, the Coptic church, the Maronite church, the Armenian church, and the Sudanese church), including their historic relationships with evangelical churches and missions,
(v)    Comment on the role of the evangelical church today and its relationships with these eastern churches, and discuss the Arab identity of the whole Church in the region both before and after Islam,
(vi)   Apply the analytical critical method to classify, compare and analyze any other group’s beliefs alongside evangelical beliefs and biblical teaching.

Christian Family Course Description

By the end of this course, the student should be able to:
(i)     List and explain Biblical principles and roles for each member of the family,
(ii)    Describe these familial roles from the background of his or her cultural system and evaluate them from Biblical perspectives,
(iii)   Share and apply Biblical perspectives on discipline in the family,
(iv)   Set and implement goals for family life,
(v)    Create a plan for family financial administration and budgeting based on good principles,
(vi)   Demonstrate the effect of the Christian home on society as a center for ministry and community development,
(vii)  Define the Biblical and cultural role of the extended family and apply the appropriate Biblical principles within a proper cultural context for extended family relations.

Social Ethics Course Description

By the end of this course the student should be able to:
(i)     Clarify current societal characteristics that affect church members in their ethical decision making,
(ii)    Name and interact with the current global social issues that are faced by his/her society,
(iii)   Apply the method of John Stott for developing ethical responses to the important ethical issues of today,
(iv)   Present a joint small group project that studies a social problem and apply the principles learned in it,
(v)    demonstrate ethical ways of thinking about the nuclear threat, the environment, work, unemployment, industrial relations, the poor, the rich and simple lifestyle, women, men and God, the culture, the family, and honor,
(vi)   Write his or her personal philosophy on social ethics with regard to the concepts of vision, work, perseverance, service and discipline.

Christian Peacemaking Course Description

By the end of this course the student should be able to:
(i)     State the theological bases for seeing reconciliation as the heart of Christian life and ministry,
(ii)    List and discuss the steps involved in biblical peacemaking,
(iii)   Explain how biblical peacemaking would work out in specific life situations,
(iv)   Take steps to facilitate biblical peacemaking in family, church, work, and society.

Poverty and Development Course Description:

In this course, the student will learn all Bible teaching in its Old and New Testaments concerning poverty and the poor and its relationship with the church and society, mention the relevant teaching and practice of the early Church Fathers, explain the theological issues related to poverty, the poor, and respective church divisions and form a better, more balanced and contemporary concept for resolving this conflict. The student will also be able to list the effective methods for response of the local church to poverty and community development, identify its responsibilities toward solving these problems, outline the relationship between universal human rights and poverty, and the concepts of biblical teaching. The student will learn and practice ways to design and evaluate simple or large projects, write funding proposals, search for financial sponsors, and learn to involve the church in the project.